Market Education

Thirty-five students and nine instructors from Omaha’s Metropolitan Community College (MCC) visited BCMC this year and got a taste of the many opportunities the structural building components industry has to offer.

For decades, SBCA Jobsite Packages have helped component manufacturers (CMs) provide handling and installation guidance to their customers with every order. These pre-assembled packages of instruction documents, attached to truss deliveries in a zippered plastic bag, are now available in a digital format.

Ready access to expertise is the biggest value you get out of being a member of SBCA. You’re just a click, call or meeting away from a lot of knowledge on the majority of topics your business addresses on a daily basis.

Do all the builders, contractors, framers, fire officials, building inspectors and lawmakers in your market understand what makes your products so great? Do they know why using components is the best way to frame? If you’re answering “no” (which is very likely), it’s time for a tour.

When PDJ Components opened its doors for a plant tour, it was an education for everyone.

SBCA’s library of technical design and installation best practices has been expanded over the past year to help CMs navigate a wide array of code-related challenges in their markets.

Sometimes it’s hard to start a conversation. You know what you want to say, you think you know how the person you’re talking to will react, and yet finding the words to get the ball rolling and respond to the questions you know you’ll get is tough.

We are concerned with SBCA’s BCSI-B1 Summary Sheet which under “Notes” makes a disclaimer. Our concern is if there would be an accident with our trusses and we point out that the bracing was not placed correctly according to SBCA documentation, which is sent with every job. If the accident goes to court, how will our attorney respond when the opposing attorney points out the disclaimer, which infers that the bracing we recommend must be flawed, otherwise it would not be disclaimed?

I am looking for a set of guidelines or “rules” for members of the SBCA. Are truss plants really not allowed to speak of business matters? I think that is unfair. I'm not going to call up our competitor and tell them that they aren't charging enough and taking all the business. I just want all the truss plants in my area to get together and decide how we are going to do business. We need to standardize the industry.

When you’re selling trusses through a lumberyard and the contractor calls to say that the “trusses don't fit correctly,” who has the ultimate responsibility for the trusses? I argue that the lumberyard is responsible since we have provided them with all the information on how the job was designed, even though they may or may not have passed this information on to the contractor.