Workforce Development

Thirty-five students and nine instructors from Omaha’s Metropolitan Community College (MCC) visited BCMC this year and got a taste of the many opportunities the structural building components industry has to offer.

Erickson team

Erickson staff, including CEO Rich Gallagher (left) and COO Reed Graham (back row, right of center)

PLTW ribbon-cutting

Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve (center), Reno High teacher Karl Kuhles (right) and his students in the STEM-based Project Lead the Way program, cut the ribbon to open the High Desert Truss and Lumber plant. 

 

I recently had a conversation with John Holland, head of IT for Clearspan Components, and he pointed out that if there’s one thing the component industry has a lot of, it’s problems

One strategy for employee retention might be training your recruiters.

For this general manager, other start-ups were more of a model than other CMs.

The best way to find future designers is to meet them where they are: in school.

“It’s too broad of a statement to say we post job openings on the internet. The type of position we are seeking determines where the ad is placed,” explained John Holland, of Clearspan Components, Inc. “For example, when seeking technical employees, there are all kinds of stratifications.”

TheTrussCo takes its workforce development efforts outside the box—and onto the airwaves.

Technical backgrounds aren't mandatory for students entering the industry with Grizzly Truss.

If you’re one of the hundreds of component manufacturers (CMs) currently challenged by finding and retaining a large enough skilled workforce to accomplish your business goals, there are no wrong answers to these questions. The only strategy to avoid is making decisions without good information.

A-1 takes a start-from-scratch approach to training new recruits.