Bracing & Restraint

If trusses blew down from insufficient temporary bracing and the contractor put them back up without the knowledge of the truss manufacturer and gave the truss manufacturer a letter stating that the trusses were okay, is that sufficient? Do you know of any truss manufacturer who would accept this?

How do I, as a truss manufacturer, adequately advise my customer against the dangers of 60 ft. and over truss span installations?

I am remodeling a 16-year-old ranch style home. The roof consists of 4/12 26 ft. span trusses, 24 in. O.C., over 2x4 stud walls. What is the recommended means of affixing the top plate of new interior partitions to provide the lateral support needed for the partition? Also, I want to hang a soffit above and overhanging the new kitchen cabinets (recessed lighting placed within). What is the recommended means of attaching the soffit to the underside of the trusses so as not to interfere with the designed movement of the trusses under the variable live load experienced (snow load)?

Is it common practice for the supplier/distributor of a truss to provide a publication regarding temporary bracing with the delivery of the material?

Are there any schematics available on how to horizontally brace a 7/12 pitch roof?

Long span trusses can pose significant risk to installers. The dimensions and weight of a long span truss can create instability, buckling and collapse of one or many trusses, if not handled, installed, restrained and braced properly. As such, they require more detailed safety and handling measures than shorter span trusses. This research report provides guidelines for proper handling and installation of long span trusses for both wood and cold-formed steel.

This presentation provides information on and requirements for the use of metal channel to meet lateral restraint/bracing requirements for metal plate connected wood trusses.

NFC member shares proper bracing in action.

Minimum top and bottom chord permanent lateral restraint/bracing of structural roof or floor trusses is assumed to be adequate when using code-compliant roof and/or ceiling diaphragms. This lateral restraint/bracing is typically accomplished with code-compliant roof /floor sheathing and fastener spacing and/or code-compliant gypsum ceiling material and fastener spacing or purlins at a given on-center spacing.