Building Component Safety Information (BCSI)

A full-scale truss bracing demo was an eye-catching feature of the BCMC 2017 show floor.

Manufactured gable ends are actually frames even though they are often referred to as trusses. The webs are “studs” oriented vertically and usually spaced at 12, 16 or 24 in. O.C. The gable end frame is designed to transfer vertical loads from the roof to the continuous bearing wall below. Another way gable end frames are different from trusses placed in the interior of the structure is that frames experience perpendicular wind loads. The sheathed frame transfers the wind loads to the roof and ceiling diaphragms and vice versa.

Is there a detailed table for gable studs that gives the maximum length a vertical member can be before a lateral brace is required?

How important is continuous lateral bracing in roof trusses? Is it detrimental to the roof integrity if it is missing?

I almost always see wood trusses erected with no stability bracing at points of support. It seems to me that common sense and section 3.3.3.4 of The American Wood Council’s National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) require that lateral support be provided at points of bearing. Plywood decking doesn't provide any more restraint for a wood truss than it does for a roof joist. I doubt if it was a concern with short span trusses having 4 in.

I would like to know the proper storage and shipping of wood trusses.

Is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to provide a sealed layout drawing for roof trusses?

Would you please inform me of the specified requirements of the size and the amount of nail attachments from the truss to the top plate?

We are concerned with SBCA’s BCSI-B1 Summary Sheet which under “Notes” makes a disclaimer. Our concern is if there would be an accident with our trusses and we point out that the bracing was not placed correctly according to SBCA documentation, which is sent with every job. If the accident goes to court, how will our attorney respond when the opposing attorney points out the disclaimer, which infers that the bracing we recommend must be flawed, otherwise it would not be disclaimed?

Is it common practice for the supplier/distributor of a truss to provide a publication regarding temporary bracing with the delivery of the material?