Installation Best Practices

A full-scale truss bracing demo was an eye-catching feature of the BCMC 2017 show floor.

For decades, SBCA Jobsite Packages have helped component manufacturers (CMs) provide handling and installation guidance to their customers with every order. These pre-assembled packages of instruction documents, attached to truss deliveries in a zippered plastic bag, are now available in a digital format.

SBCA’s library of technical design and installation best practices has been expanded over the past year to help CMs navigate a wide array of code-related challenges in their markets.

I recall seeing a design recommendation several years ago regarding installation of hanger nails above the neutral axis of the bottom chord of a plated girder truss. The intent was to avoid dumping large loads into the bottom chord, below the neutral axis. Can you tell me where I can find this information?

If you use hurricane clips to secure roof trusses from uplift, are you allowed to use fewer than the typical three nails in the bearing heel of the roof truss? I am concerned because we want to do the right fastening schedule, but three nails in addition to the hurricane clip splits the wood. What is the standard recommendation?

What is the correct method of attaching scissors trusses to the top plate? I read recently in a trade magazine that this type of truss should be toe-nailed on one end and attached with slotted clips on the other end. According to the article, this is to allow for movement of the truss. We require PE stamped spec sheets from the truss manufacturer to verify trusses meet wind and snow loads. These sheets give bracing requirements but never give recommended attachment requirements.

Are there any trusses that are supported strictly by the wood itself without any mechanical connections such as brackets?

I am a building inspector and have some questions regarding how to apply IBC 2012 2308.8.5 (IRC 2012 R802.8) (similar IBC 2015 2308.4.6 & IRC 2015 R802.8) to trusses, especially those with high heels:

Would you please inform me of the specified requirements of the size and the amount of nail attachments from the truss to the top plate?

The industry suggests notching the gable end truss to support the overhang. Is this wise? What about a structural gable, or a gable designed with drag loads, or one with only partial bearing? How safe is it for a framer working with a truss that has the top chord cut repeatedly?