Jobsite Documents

For decades, SBCA Jobsite Packages have helped component manufacturers (CMs) provide handling and installation guidance to their customers with every order. These pre-assembled packages of instruction documents, attached to truss deliveries in a zippered plastic bag, are now available in a digital format.

What is the correct method of attaching scissors trusses to the top plate? I read recently in a trade magazine that this type of truss should be toe-nailed on one end and attached with slotted clips on the other end. According to the article, this is to allow for movement of the truss. We require PE stamped spec sheets from the truss manufacturer to verify trusses meet wind and snow loads. These sheets give bracing requirements but never give recommended attachment requirements.

Are there any trusses that are supported strictly by the wood itself without any mechanical connections such as brackets?

I am a building inspector and I have a question on information provided on truss design drawings. What does the uplift reaction number represent? Some manufacturers are very specific and state “to provide for mechanical connection of the truss to the top plate with a connector capable of withstanding a specific load.” Others simply list the uplift reaction with no further information. These are the ones that have caused a debate as to what the number actually represents.

As an engineer, I have noticed truss designers in some high wind states routinely using “Main Wind-Force Resisting Systems” wind pressure coefficients as opposed to “Components and Cladding” coefficients to design for wind uplift. A roof truss is not a main wind-force resisting system and would have to have a tributary area of more than 1000 sq. ft. before qualifying for the lower Primary Frame coefficients. In my experience this practice is routine.

I am a truss manufacturer in an area of the country that often has some pretty severe winters. It concerns me how little some of the local builders seem to know about snow load design. What are some of the things that need to be considered?

We are planning to add 1/2 in. cement board and 3/8 in. quarry tile to a kitchen floor. We need to know if the floor trusses will handle the additional weight. The floor trusses are 19.2 in. O.C. and the loading numbers are 40-10-0-5. What do these numbers mean?

We are concerned with SBCA’s BCSI-B1 Summary Sheet which under “Notes” makes a disclaimer. Our concern is if there would be an accident with our trusses and we point out that the bracing was not placed correctly according to SBCA documentation, which is sent with every job. If the accident goes to court, how will our attorney respond when the opposing attorney points out the disclaimer, which infers that the bracing we recommend must be flawed, otherwise it would not be disclaimed?

As the owner for a building designed to have metal plate wood trusses, what documentation should I receive to be assured that the manufactured wood trusses delivered to the site have indeed been manufactured at a licensed and registered wood truss manufacturer under the required written quality control procedures?

I am reviewing a truss package that includes multi-ply trusses. Where do I find the requirements for the attachment of the individual trusses to each other (nails and/or bolts)? Is this a requirement that the structural engineer of record needs to supply or is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to design?