Construction

The Structural Building Components Association (SBCA) and its National Framers Council (NFC) are pleased to announce confirmation of approval for a Susan Harwood Training Grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Susan Harwood Training Grants are awarded to nonprofit organizations to help fund the development of training and education courses for workers and employers exposed to workplace safety and health hazards.

When Jim’s Apple Barn, the largest candy store in Minnesota, wanted to expand by way of adding a confection-filled planetarium to the end of a blazing yellow barn already bursting with sweets, it had a difficult time finding a truss company willing to take on the project. “We were the only ones that said yes,” recalled Trevor Ebinger, a member of the Manion Lumber & Truss sales staff. “It was quite an undertaking.”

For decades, SBCA Jobsite Packages have helped component manufacturers (CMs) provide handling and installation guidance to their customers with every order. These pre-assembled packages of instruction documents, attached to truss deliveries in a zippered plastic bag, are now available in a digital format.

When Mandere Construction couldn’t get the trusses it needed to frame its projects, owner John Mandere went looking for the best truss folks he could find—and hired them

Your company does it every day: load components and deliver them to jobsites. Ben Vadnais, assistant plant manager at Windsor Building Systems, has a few tips for keeping your loading and delivery operations running as smoothly and safely as possible.

If you’ve been in the truss industry for any length of time, there’s one phone call you absolutely dread receiving: “We have a problem; your trusses collapsed!”

SBCA’s library of technical design and installation best practices has been expanded over the past year to help CMs navigate a wide array of code-related challenges in their markets.

The QuickTie System is a roof and wall anchoring system consisting of wire rope and threaded studs swaged to each end. One of the threaded studs is embedded into cured concrete by inserting it into a predrilled hole and using epoxy adhesive to anchor it to the foundation. The opposite end of the wire rope with the threaded stud is extended vertically to the uppermost top of the masonry wall, inserted through a hole drilled through the wood top plate(s), and attached to a steel plate and nut that are placed on top of the top plates(s).

I was wondering if you have any information or anecdotes relating to the deflection performance of long span scissors trusses? We recently sold a job with 70 ft. long scissors trusses. The customer is in the process of installing the trusses and doesn't like the deflections he is seeing. To make matters worse, the scissors trusses are framing into a valley set (which we provided) that is erected on 35 ft. Howe trusses. The Howe trusses are exhibiting very little deflection. Any ideas?

We have a local builder wishing to use floor trusses with a 2-hour assembly. I have shown him the 2-hour design on pages 17-27 of the second edition of SBCA’s Metal Plate Connected Wood Truss Handbook. Is this assembly UL approved? If so, what is the design number?