Construction

SBCA’s library of technical design and installation best practices has been expanded over the past year to help CMs navigate a wide array of code-related challenges in their markets.

The QuickTie System is a roof and wall anchoring system consisting of wire rope and threaded studs swaged to each end. One of the threaded studs is embedded into cured concrete by inserting it into a predrilled hole and using epoxy adhesive to anchor it to the foundation. The opposite end of the wire rope with the threaded stud is extended vertically to the uppermost top of the masonry wall, inserted through a hole drilled through the wood top plate(s), and attached to a steel plate and nut that are placed on top of the top plates(s).

In a hip roof application where jack trusses connect to a girder truss using pressure blocking (power blocking), what is the proper installation and the span that is acceptable before a hanger is required?

I have just moved into a new home and during the construction I noticed that one of the trusses in the garage was damaged. The web plate had come off in two different locations. I notified the builder and they said they would take care of it. Approximately two weeks after I moved in, I noticed the ceiling in the garage started to sag, so I went into the space above the garage and found the truss was never repaired. I again notified the builder and they sent someone to fix it. I went and looked at the fix and this is where my question comes in.

I recall seeing a design recommendation several years ago regarding installation of hanger nails above the neutral axis of the bottom chord of a plated girder truss. The intent was to avoid dumping large loads into the bottom chord, below the neutral axis. Can you tell me where I can find this information?

I would like to know the proper storage and shipping of wood trusses.

I am a building inspector and have some questions regarding how to apply IBC 2012 2308.8.5 (IRC 2012 R802.8) (similar IBC 2015 2308.4.6 & IRC 2015 R802.8) to trusses, especially those with high heels:

Are trusses required to have tags on all bearings that are not at the heel location? What about tags on webs requiring lateral reinforcement?

I am a truss manufacturer in an area of the country that often has some pretty severe winters. It concerns me how little some of the local builders seem to know about snow load design. What are some of the things that need to be considered?

I am a structural engineer designing pool cage structures that are typically attached to the house at the fascia board. Sometimes, the structure is attached where trusses are behind the fascia board and other times there is a framed gable end overhang. Do you know of any information concerning this additional load on the trusses or overhang under design wind loads? Is there a limiting distance on the amount of overhang? I know trusses are designed for certain uplift and the pool cage will add to this uplift at design load, but what about the gable end overhangs?