Construction

The industry suggests notching the gable end truss to support the overhang. Is this wise? What about a structural gable, or a gable designed with drag loads, or one with only partial bearing? How safe is it for a framer working with a truss that has the top chord cut repeatedly?

We are concerned with SBCA’s BCSI-B1 Summary Sheet which under “Notes” makes a disclaimer. Our concern is if there would be an accident with our trusses and we point out that the bracing was not placed correctly according to SBCA documentation, which is sent with every job. If the accident goes to court, how will our attorney respond when the opposing attorney points out the disclaimer, which infers that the bracing we recommend must be flawed, otherwise it would not be disclaimed?

I am looking for strongback bracing requirements for a 12 in. deep residential floor system with trusses in lengths up to 19 ft. Can the strongback bracing end at a truss without tying into an end wall? For instance, can three trusses of a type be tied together by strongbacks, then the next series of different trusses be tied together without having to be tied back to the previous type of trusses?

Are there any published studies or guidelines on the fire rating of floor trusses built with 2x3 lumber?

I am reviewing a truss package that includes multi-ply trusses. Where do I find the requirements for the attachment of the individual trusses to each other (nails and/or bolts)? Is this a requirement that the structural engineer of record needs to supply or is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to design?

I own and live in the middle unit of a one-story tri-plex that has a truss-framed roof. The interior has high ceilings that would potentially allow the addition of a second floor room. I am contemplating adding a shed dormer to create a second story bedroom. Do you have any suggestions as to how a shed dormer could be added? I am familiar with how to frame up a shed dormer if the original framing were rafters and a ridge board, but the truss construction has thrown me for a loop.

Some truss lumber repair nailing patterns call for 16d common nails. Most nail guns do not support 16d nails, but have an equivalent to a 12/10d nail. Is there a substitution guide or ESR report that could help us?

Can I safely install 3/4 in. T&G, OSB on 2x4 trusses that are 24 in. O.C.? My roof was installed over 5/8 in. plywood without clips that have caused a lot of sagging and the shingles need replacing. I want to “fix” it one time and install architecture type shingles, but the garage is 24 ft. wide and 28 ft. long without any load bearing walls. My concern is the weight on the trusses. 5/8 in. plywood weighs 52 lbs. and the OSB weighs 78 lbs. for each 4 ft. x 8 ft. sheet. The roof will require about 84 4 ft. x 8 ft. sheets to cover, which equals about 2,184 lbs.

I have a four-year-old house with glued open-web trusses. Both the truss manufacturer and the builder have admitted to me that the trusses were installed wrong. I have a problem with the suggested repair. I have hired a structural engineer and he suggested installing a 2x10 between each truss and removing the old truss. This would have to take place on both the first and second floors because all the trusses were installed wrong. The manufacturers want to install six strongbacks on each floor, hoping this will tighten them up.

I am a professional engineer looking for information concerning the failure of metal plate connected wood trusses and methods of repair. I am looking for this information with regard to developing recommendations for the repair of truss systems in the floor structures of two-story multi-family dwellings. I see frequent failure of truss systems of this type in both in bending and due to catastrophic failure at the gussets.