Design Documents

How much OSB can be stacked on a floor deck without damaging the trusses?

I have built a 30 ft. x 40 ft. pole barn with nine 30 ft. 2x4 7/12 pitch trusses that are 5 ft. O.C. I am planning to finish out the interior and will attach 7/16 x 4 x 8 OSB sheets to the trusses for my ceiling. Along with this, I will have to add several 2x4 nailers across the 30 ft. span between the trusses to attach the sheeting to. My question is: will these trusses have any problem supporting this ceiling? I am not planning on anything being placed in the section above the ceiling and there will be no walls or supports erected between the ceiling and the floor.

I am looking for information on point loading trusses. We manufacture mounting structures for solar panels. Typically, 10 to 15 sq. ft. of solar panel is supported by one standoff. Under extreme conditions – 50 lbs. per sq. ft. of wind load - we can transfer 500 to 750 lbs. of force onto one point of one truss. Are there any standards on this issue?

Can you explain drag loads and how to calculate a drag load pertaining to roof trusses?

Can I put a wood deck (1/2 in. plywood) on top of the bottom chord of a 26 foot span truss 24 inches on center?

I am a structural engineer designing pool cage structures that are typically attached to the house at the fascia board. Sometimes, the structure is attached where trusses are behind the fascia board and other times there is a framed gable end overhang. Do you know of any information concerning this additional load on the trusses or overhang under design wind loads? Is there a limiting distance on the amount of overhang? I know trusses are designed for certain uplift and the pool cage will add to this uplift at design load, but what about the gable end overhangs?

I am a building inspector and I have a question on information provided on truss design drawings. What does the uplift reaction number represent? Some manufacturers are very specific and state “to provide for mechanical connection of the truss to the top plate with a connector capable of withstanding a specific load.” Others simply list the uplift reaction with no further information. These are the ones that have caused a debate as to what the number actually represents.

Can I safely install 3/4 in. T&G, OSB on 2x4 trusses that are 24 in. O.C.? My roof was installed over 5/8 in. plywood without clips that have caused a lot of sagging and the shingles need replacing. I want to “fix” it one time and install architecture type shingles, but the garage is 24 ft. wide and 28 ft. long without any load bearing walls. My concern is the weight on the trusses. 5/8 in. plywood weighs 52 lbs. and the OSB weighs 78 lbs. for each 4 ft. x 8 ft. sheet. The roof will require about 84 4 ft. x 8 ft. sheets to cover, which equals about 2,184 lbs.

As an engineer, I have noticed truss designers in some high wind states routinely using “Main Wind-Force Resisting Systems” wind pressure coefficients as opposed to “Components and Cladding” coefficients to design for wind uplift. A roof truss is not a main wind-force resisting system and would have to have a tributary area of more than 1000 sq. ft. before qualifying for the lower Primary Frame coefficients. In my experience this practice is routine.

I am a truss manufacturer in an area of the country that often has some pretty severe winters. It concerns me how little some of the local builders seem to know about snow load design. What are some of the things that need to be considered?