Engineering

The industry suggests notching the gable end truss to support the overhang. Is this wise? What about a structural gable, or a gable designed with drag loads, or one with only partial bearing? How safe is it for a framer working with a truss that has the top chord cut repeatedly?

I am a building inspector and I have a question on information provided on truss design drawings. What does the uplift reaction number represent? Some manufacturers are very specific and state “to provide for mechanical connection of the truss to the top plate with a connector capable of withstanding a specific load.” Others simply list the uplift reaction with no further information. These are the ones that have caused a debate as to what the number actually represents.

If trusses blew down from insufficient temporary bracing and the contractor put them back up without the knowledge of the truss manufacturer and gave the truss manufacturer a letter stating that the trusses were okay, is that sufficient? Do you know of any truss manufacturer who would accept this?

My company supplied roof trusses for a hotel project. The building inspector shut the project down because the trusses were not designed to account for additional snowdrift loading. The construction plans did not contain any snowdrift loading information. The architect is claiming it is our responsibility to determine drift loading, therefore we must fix the problem. Do you have any documentation to help us dispute the architect’s claim?

I am reviewing a truss package that includes multi-ply trusses. Where do I find the requirements for the attachment of the individual trusses to each other (nails and/or bolts)? Is this a requirement that the structural engineer of record needs to supply or is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to design?

I have mono trusses on either side of a firewall. I have the fire rating/wall material between them. Can I place a ridge vent above these two? Or should I use vents? How do I calculate the appropriate vent sizes and styles?

I am installing a 40-foot scissor truss that is designed to deflect about ½ inch. I am concerned that the deflection will cause an interior partition wall to pick up some load from the truss and transfer it to the floor system. Should I double up the I-joists under this partition to pick up the extra load?

As a home inspector, I have recently inspected an existing home with an attic truss system installed. Several of the truss web members have been cut away to allow access to an attic-mounted heating system. Can you recommend repairs to a truss with cut web members?

The lumber used in most metal plate connected wood trusses is either visually- or mechanically-graded solid sawn dimensional lumber. However, the Truss Plate Institute's ANSI/TPI 1 allows the use of structural composite lumber (SCL) products such as laminated veneer lumber (LVL), laminated strand lumber (LSL) and parallel strand lumber (PSL). These engineered wood products can conceivably compete with sawn lumber and complement it in truss designs.

We recently received bids on a school project, which referenced UL P523. This assembly used light-gauge steel trusses. We noted on the drawing that we could accept an alternate design using wood trusses in lieu of light-gauge steel framing, if the alternate design could meet the fire ratings.