Lumber Treatments

This report focuses on building code requirements for using fire retardant treated wood (FRTW) in floor/ceiling and roof/ceiling assemblies in Type III building construction. 

I am thinking of using wood trusses for the roofing/ceiling structural systems on some houses I shall build. I remember, though, an engineer/volunteer fireman commenting back in 1989 that the connector plates are prone to expand and pop off, early on in a fire, causing catastrophic structural failure. Was this the case, and if so, has this problem been corrected?

Does the NFPA sprinkler standard address sprinkler loading? If so, how and where do I buy it? What other information do you have on sprinkler loading? How do other truss companies price jobs for sprinkler loading the plans do not include a sprinkler layout or even say what size/type of sprinkler system will be used?

Are there any published studies or guidelines on the fire rating of floor trusses built with 2x3 lumber?

I have been hired by an insurance company to determine the extent of damage to roof trusses exposed to fire. How much fire damage compromises the structural integrity of the truss?

I need to obtain some information on fire-retardant-treated roof trusses.

Is it possible to construct an assembly for ceiling between first and second floors using 2x with few layers of gypsum to obtain a 3-hour fire rating?

I have a 29 x 72 mobile office with a 2-foot deep wooden truss above the ceiling that a client is required to sprinkler. Is there any way to avoid sprinklering above the gypboard ceiling?

We recently received bids on a school project, which referenced UL P523. This assembly used light-gauge steel trusses. We noted on the drawing that we could accept an alternate design using wood trusses in lieu of light-gauge steel framing, if the alternate design could meet the fire ratings.

Can one use pressure-treated lumber in metal plate connected truss construction? If so, are special plates or coatings required?