Performance

I recall seeing a design recommendation several years ago regarding installation of hanger nails above the neutral axis of the bottom chord of a plated girder truss. The intent was to avoid dumping large loads into the bottom chord, below the neutral axis. Can you tell me where I can find this information?

We are experiencing problems with bouncy wood floor trusses. I'm wondering what the industry standard is on deflections (live and total load). Also, do you have any ideas on how to decrease the deflection without affecting the profit margin significantly?

If trusses blew down from insufficient temporary bracing and the contractor put them back up without the knowledge of the truss manufacturer and gave the truss manufacturer a letter stating that the trusses were okay, is that sufficient? Do you know of any truss manufacturer who would accept this?

What are the requirements on the permanent bracing of bottom chords? Can gypsum board diaphragms be used?

Do you have sound rating information for floor truss assemblies (i.e., STC and IIC ratings)? We are looking specifically for ratings for 12 in. floor trusses, with 1 and 1/2 in. concrete topping and without the topping. We are looking to meet the minimum code rating of STC 45 and IIC 45.

Is finger-jointed material allowed in the manufacturing of trusses?

I am a structural engineer designing pool cage structures that are typically attached to the house at the fascia board. Sometimes, the structure is attached where trusses are behind the fascia board and other times there is a framed gable end overhang. Do you know of any information concerning this additional load on the trusses or overhang under design wind loads? Is there a limiting distance on the amount of overhang? I know trusses are designed for certain uplift and the pool cage will add to this uplift at design load, but what about the gable end overhangs?

Are wood trusses designed to be fall protection anchors that would support a worker should he fall?

I am installing a 40-foot scissor truss that is designed to deflect about ½ inch. I am concerned that the deflection will cause an interior partition wall to pick up some load from the truss and transfer it to the floor system. Should I double up the I-joists under this partition to pick up the extra load?

Our home caught fire last month and burned partly through a tongue and groove ceiling to the trusses. Some are charred. Our contractor did a moisture meter test. An engineer for the insurance company said the trusses were only smoke damaged & the moisture meter test is invalid (it can be set to read anything). I found one article on charred trusses, but it’s pretty vague. We do not feel safe with the insurance engineer’s assessment because some of the trusses are obviously charred. We hired an engineer who agreed with us.