Roof Trusses

When Jim’s Apple Barn, the largest candy store in Minnesota, wanted to expand by way of adding a confection-filled planetarium to the end of a blazing yellow barn already bursting with sweets, it had a difficult time finding a truss company willing to take on the project. “We were the only ones that said yes,” recalled Trevor Ebinger, a member of the Manion Lumber & Truss sales staff. “It was quite an undertaking.”

A little forethought can prevent the potential overstress that occurs when deflection leads to rooftop ponding.

The BFS design team in Shelby, Alabama “collaborate on anything that doesn’t sit right,” says Thom Patton. One result: a roof that rests perfectly on a school building after a simplified build and easy install process.

This Research Report will look specifically at the sill plate requirements according to the 2009, 2012, and 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) and International Building Code (IBC) and clarify if a sill plate is required in the following conditions:

  • Flat truss bottom chord bearing on ICF wall.
  • Flat truss top chord bearing on ICF wall.
  • Roof truss bearing on ICF wall.

Long span trusses can pose significant risk to installers. The dimensions and weight of a long span truss can create instability, buckling and collapse of one or many trusses, if not handled, installed, restrained and braced properly. As such, they require more detailed safety and handling measures than shorter span trusses. This research report provides guidelines for proper handling and installation of long span trusses for both wood and cold-formed steel.

Controlling sound transmission in buildings through wall, floor and ceiling assemblies is important for the comfort level and enjoyment of building occupants as they live, work and play in these buildings. This report aims to explore the methods one can use to reduce sound transmission in assemblies constructed with wood trusses.

This presentation provides information on truss submittal packages.

This report discusses ways of increasing the energy efficiency requirements of the building envelope within the context of the requirements of the 2009, 2012 and 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) and IECC for ceiling insulation and truss heel heights.

“More often than  not, if it’s a flat roof, it has a green roof on it.”

 

This presentation provides information on heel blocking requirements and related analysis.