Products

I recall seeing a design recommendation several years ago regarding installation of hanger nails above the neutral axis of the bottom chord of a plated girder truss. The intent was to avoid dumping large loads into the bottom chord, below the neutral axis. Can you tell me where I can find this information?

The Corps' guide spec for wood construction requires the drawings to indicate the design forces on each truss member for the worst loading condition. Loading conditions, of course, can include wind, snow build up, and unbalanced loading, to name a few. Many A/E firms submit drawings lacking these member forces, but instead show typical loading conditions. What does the wood truss fabricator want to see – truss diagrams with maximum loads on each member? Or would he prefer to design the truss from many required loading diagrams?

Are there charts illustrating allowable HVAC duct sizes that can fit between truss chords for various truss depths?

Can one use pressure-treated lumber in metal plate connected truss construction? If so, are special plates or coatings required?

We have been using Turb-O-Webs for about four months. We are very happy with their performance, although there have been a few ripples along the way. The main thing that concerns me at present is the need for performance documentation and testing data. Do you have anything that will help, or know of people or organizations that could offer assistance?

I am researching building products for a new home and I wanted to use metal plate connected floor trusses. When I took my plans to the builder, they cautioned me against using these floor trusses. They stated that they were not engineered products, they do not carry any kind of warranty, and they do not know how long they last over time. My basement span is 30 ft., they said trusses could not span 30 ft. I really would like to use floor trusses, but now I am unsure. Could you offer any information?

We are building churches in Europe. These are modified pole barns and we are trying to use local materials and local volunteer labor. Since the truss is the heart of the building, I am looking for a method to test some completed trusses before the building is started to make sure they are strong enough.

Our home caught fire last month and burned partly through a tongue and groove ceiling to the trusses. Some are charred. Our contractor did a moisture meter test. An engineer for the insurance company said the trusses were only smoke damaged & the moisture meter test is invalid (it can be set to read anything). I found one article on charred trusses, but it’s pretty vague. We do not feel safe with the insurance engineer’s assessment because some of the trusses are obviously charred. We hired an engineer who agreed with us.

We have been specifying laminated veneer lumber (LVL) beams for some time now. The plans usually state, “Beam to be engineered and supplied by truss manufacturer.” What kind of liability issues do I need to watch out for?

Is lag bolting the bottom chord of a truss to the top plate of a wall a proper fix to correct truss arching, assuming the attic is properly vented?