Risk Management

Understanding & Minimizing Your Customer Contract Risks

Kent has an in-depth understanding of our industry from quoting and contracting, through design, manufacturing, quality control and final delivery.  Kent’s two part presentation will be geared to management and sales personnel with regards to the quoting and contracting process and the associated risks.  Be sure to have your questions ready for Part 1 of this presentation and Part 2 which will be announced at a later date.

What level, if any, of responsibility does a CM assume if the contractors on the jobsite use our layout plans to do more than just put the walls together? Specifically on the job in question, the panel layout was used to place plumbing for a kitchen island. Unfortunately, the layout had the pony wall for that island out of place by 11”. As a result, there is additional work needed to relocate the plumbing.

Do you know how much coverage you have or what to do if a collision occurs?

From increasing security to improving the quality of temporary workers, the cameras Woodhaven installed six years ago have provided a significant return on investment.

OSHA announced a heightened focus on cuts and amputation hazards after having received more than 2,600 reports of amputations nationwide in 2015. One CM discusses the benefits of taking a proactive approach, starting with proper machine guarding.

For decades, SBCA Jobsite Packages have helped component manufacturers (CMs) provide handling and installation guidance to their customers with every order. These pre-assembled packages of instruction documents, attached to truss deliveries in a zippered plastic bag, are now available in a digital format.

This presentation examines the different ways that the organizations that publish evaluation reports handle liability, and what this means for the manufacturer seeking a Technical Evaluation Report (TER) for their product.

Your company does it every day: load components and deliver them to jobsites. Ben Vadnais, assistant plant manager at Windsor Building Systems, has a few tips for keeping your loading and delivery operations running as smoothly and safely as possible.

When you’re selling trusses through a lumberyard and the contractor calls to say that the “trusses don't fit correctly,” who has the ultimate responsibility for the trusses? I argue that the lumberyard is responsible since we have provided them with all the information on how the job was designed, even though they may or may not have passed this information on to the contractor.

I have mono trusses on either side of a firewall. I have the fire rating/wall material between them. Can I place a ridge vent above these two? Or should I use vents? How do I calculate the appropriate vent sizes and styles?