Field Repairs & Alterations

This article will briefly explore how these calls can impact a CM’s bottom line and a few ways in which CMs can proactively work with tradespeople to avoid such issues. Truss repairs can very easily turn a profitable job into a money losing project. The cost incurred with this type of repair goes beyond the price of the materials. Costs for determining the issue for repair, designing the repair, and implementing a repair solution shouldn’t get lost in your accounting books. 

The tables are intended as a practical tool to assist contractors in the selection of footing widths and the determination of the quantity of wood studs required for supporting the end reactions of beams, girders, and/or headers. 

Our home has 2x4 roof trusses spanning 25 ft. spaced 16 in. O.C. Currently, there is limited attic storage on a plywood subfloor on the bottom chords, accessed via a small hatch in a closet. We would like to install a fold-down attic stair with a rough opening size of 25.5 in. x 54 in., with the long dimension perpendicular to the trusses. This would mean cutting the bottom chords of three trusses to frame the opening. Is this possible?

I am doing research for clients who have flat roof trusses to which they are adding a second story. We are now looking for information on the trusses to determine what their load capability is. What do you need to know to help us determine this?

I have built a 30 ft. x 40 ft. pole barn with nine 30 ft. 2x4 7/12 pitch trusses that are 5 ft. O.C. I am planning to finish out the interior and will attach 7/16 x 4 x 8 OSB sheets to the trusses for my ceiling. Along with this, I will have to add several 2x4 nailers across the 30 ft. span between the trusses to attach the sheeting to. My question is: will these trusses have any problem supporting this ceiling? I am not planning on anything being placed in the section above the ceiling and there will be no walls or supports erected between the ceiling and the floor.

I am looking for information on point loading trusses. We manufacture mounting structures for solar panels. Typically, 10 to 15 sq. ft. of solar panel is supported by one standoff. Under extreme conditions – 50 lbs. per sq. ft. of wind load - we can transfer 500 to 750 lbs. of force onto one point of one truss. Are there any standards on this issue?

I have just moved into a new home and during the construction I noticed that one of the trusses in the garage was damaged. The web plate had come off in two different locations. I notified the builder and they said they would take care of it. Approximately two weeks after I moved in, I noticed the ceiling in the garage started to sag, so I went into the space above the garage and found the truss was never repaired. I again notified the builder and they sent someone to fix it. I went and looked at the fix and this is where my question comes in.

I have mono trusses on either side of a firewall. I have the fire rating/wall material between them. Can I place a ridge vent above these two? Or should I use vents? How do I calculate the appropriate vent sizes and styles?

We are planning to add 1/2 in. cement board and 3/8 in. quarry tile to a kitchen floor. We need to know if the floor trusses will handle the additional weight. The floor trusses are 19.2 in. O.C. and the loading numbers are 40-10-0-5. What do these numbers mean?

Occasionally we deal with truss failures due to impact and or crushing forces such as trees falling onto roof structures. At what point can the truss no longer be repaired? Also, what should an adjuster look for when determining repair-ability? Or should a storm adjuster basically punt and call a consultant for every truss failure?