Field Repairs & Alterations

The tables are intended as a practical tool to assist contractors in the selection of footing widths and the determination of the quantity of wood studs required for supporting the end reactions of beams, girders, and/or headers. 

I am looking for information on point loading trusses. We manufacture mounting structures for solar panels. Typically, 10 to 15 sq. ft. of solar panel is supported by one standoff. Under extreme conditions – 50 lbs. per sq. ft. of wind load - we can transfer 500 to 750 lbs. of force onto one point of one truss. Are there any standards on this issue?

I have just moved into a new home and during the construction I noticed that one of the trusses in the garage was damaged. The web plate had come off in two different locations. I notified the builder and they said they would take care of it. Approximately two weeks after I moved in, I noticed the ceiling in the garage started to sag, so I went into the space above the garage and found the truss was never repaired. I again notified the builder and they sent someone to fix it. I went and looked at the fix and this is where my question comes in.

I have mono trusses on either side of a firewall. I have the fire rating/wall material between them. Can I place a ridge vent above these two? Or should I use vents? How do I calculate the appropriate vent sizes and styles?

We are planning to add 1/2 in. cement board and 3/8 in. quarry tile to a kitchen floor. We need to know if the floor trusses will handle the additional weight. The floor trusses are 19.2 in. O.C. and the loading numbers are 40-10-0-5. What do these numbers mean?

Occasionally we deal with truss failures due to impact and or crushing forces such as trees falling onto roof structures. At what point can the truss no longer be repaired? Also, what should an adjuster look for when determining repair-ability? Or should a storm adjuster basically punt and call a consultant for every truss failure?

I am a professional engineer looking for information concerning the failure of metal plate connected wood trusses and methods of repair. I am looking for this information with regard to developing recommendations for the repair of truss systems in the floor structures of two-story multi-family dwellings. I see frequent failure of truss systems of this type in both in bending and due to catastrophic failure at the gussets.

Can I put a wood deck (1/2 in. plywood) on top of the bottom chord of a 26 foot span truss 24 inches on center?

Our home caught fire last month and burned partly through a tongue and groove ceiling to the trusses. Some are charred. Our contractor did a moisture meter test. An engineer for the insurance company said the trusses were only smoke damaged & the moisture meter test is invalid (it can be set to read anything). I found one article on charred trusses, but it’s pretty vague. We do not feel safe with the insurance engineer’s assessment because some of the trusses are obviously charred. We hired an engineer who agreed with us.

I am a structural engineer designing pool cage structures that are typically attached to the house at the fascia board. Sometimes, the structure is attached where trusses are behind the fascia board and other times there is a framed gable end overhang. Do you know of any information concerning this additional load on the trusses or overhang under design wind loads? Is there a limiting distance on the amount of overhang? I know trusses are designed for certain uplift and the pool cage will add to this uplift at design load, but what about the gable end overhangs?