Jobsite Safety

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OSHA is moving to finalize changes to its crane operator certification requirements, according to a proposed rule published in the May 21 Federal Register.

Sobering statistics about the top causes of workplace injuries and fatalities provide the foundation for NFC’s recent work with OSHA to develop safety posters as part of its partnership in the 2018 Safe+Sound Campaign, coming the week of August 13-19.

On May 7-11, construction crews across the nation took part in OSHA’s National Safety Stand-Down, an annual opportunity for framers to discuss safety with their employees and emphasize the importance of fall prevention. 

In May 2016, OSHA published its new recordkeeping rule, officially named “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses.”

Can you really dig down to the essence of a matter and explain it in simple, understandable terms?

OSHA is delaying its deadline for employers to ensure that crane operators are certified by one year until November 10, 2018.

OSHA’s new crystalline silica standard, which went into effect on September 23, has raised many questions for framers. 

In the past, the most common way to measure the safety performance of a business was to look at “lagging” indicators. The number of incidents and injuries would be metrics tasked with painting a comprehensive picture of the EHS performance of an organization, even if they entirely were based on historic data. Lagging indicators are easy to measure, but typically offer insight into the outcome of a process only after an incident has taken place. That means they’re rather tricky to influence.
 

Authorities are saying that a 43-year old concrete worker who plummeted 28 stories to his death on Sept. 21 probably fell through a hole in the floor at the Manhattan high rise.