Construction

The Gypsum Association “Fire Resistance Design Manual” (GA-600-12) lists file RC2601 with two layers of 5/8 in. gypsum wallboard (GWB) on wood joists.

If trusses blew down from insufficient temporary bracing and the contractor put them back up without the knowledge of the truss manufacturer and gave the truss manufacturer a letter stating that the trusses were okay, is that sufficient? Do you know of any truss manufacturer who would accept this?

I am installing a 40-foot scissor truss that is designed to deflect about ½ inch. I am concerned that the deflection will cause an interior partition wall to pick up some load from the truss and transfer it to the floor system. Should I double up the I-joists under this partition to pick up the extra load?

I have mono trusses on either side of a firewall. I have the fire rating/wall material between them. Can I place a ridge vent above these two? Or should I use vents? How do I calculate the appropriate vent sizes and styles?

How much OSB can be stacked on a floor deck without damaging the trusses?

I almost always see wood trusses erected with no stability bracing at points of support. It seems to me that common sense and section 3.3.3.4 of The American Wood Council’s National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) require that lateral support be provided at points of bearing. Plywood decking doesn't provide any more restraint for a wood truss than it does for a roof joist. I doubt if it was a concern with short span trusses having 4 in.

I am remodeling a 16-year-old ranch style home. The roof consists of 4/12 26 ft. span trusses, 24 in. O.C., over 2x4 stud walls. What is the recommended means of affixing the top plate of new interior partitions to provide the lateral support needed for the partition? Also, I want to hang a soffit above and overhanging the new kitchen cabinets (recessed lighting placed within). What is the recommended means of attaching the soffit to the underside of the trusses so as not to interfere with the designed movement of the trusses under the variable live load experienced (snow load)?

The industry suggests notching the gable end truss to support the overhang. Is this wise? What about a structural gable, or a gable designed with drag loads, or one with only partial bearing? How safe is it for a framer working with a truss that has the top chord cut repeatedly?

The truss industry maintains that the design of truss roof and floor system permanent bracing is the responsibility of the building designer. System permanent bracing covers the entire structure and all bracing element interactions.

Is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to provide a sealed layout drawing for roof trusses?