Construction

In May 2016, OSHA published its new recordkeeping rule, officially named “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses.”

Can you really dig down to the essence of a matter and explain it in simple, understandable terms?

OSHA is delaying its deadline for employers to ensure that crane operators are certified by one year until November 10, 2018.

OSHA’s new crystalline silica standard, which went into effect on September 23, has raised many questions for framers. 

Super Anchor Safety is excited to announce the launch of a revolutionary Fall Protection System that Installs with No Fasteners. 

In the past, the most common way to measure the safety performance of a business was to look at “lagging” indicators. The number of incidents and injuries would be metrics tasked with painting a comprehensive picture of the EHS performance of an organization, even if they entirely were based on historic data. Lagging indicators are easy to measure, but typically offer insight into the outcome of a process only after an incident has taken place. That means they’re rather tricky to influence.
 

Authorities are saying that a 43-year old concrete worker who plummeted 28 stories to his death on Sept. 21 probably fell through a hole in the floor at the Manhattan high rise.

Change can be difficult, but managers and workers must realize that, when changes in safety requirements occur, it’s always in the best interest of the worker. All injuries in the work place are preventable; there is no excuse for a worker to sustain an injury in modern construction.

The Structural Building Components Association (SBCA) and its National Framers Council (NFC) are pleased to announce confirmation of approval for a Susan Harwood Training Grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Susan Harwood Training Grants are awarded to nonprofit organizations to help fund the development of training and education courses for workers and employers exposed to workplace safety and health hazards.

When Jim’s Apple Barn, the largest candy store in Minnesota, wanted to expand by way of adding a confection-filled planetarium to the end of a blazing yellow barn already bursting with sweets, it had a difficult time finding a truss company willing to take on the project. “We were the only ones that said yes,” recalled Trevor Ebinger, a member of the Manion Lumber & Truss sales staff. “It was quite an undertaking.”