Non-Residential Codes (IBC)

Working with city officials to understand the drawbacks to sealed TPDs

The following is a summary of code change proposals to the 2018 International Building Code (IBC) which have been submitted by various foam plastic insulation associations, including the FSC, XPSA, PIMA, and CPI. 

Since FRTW studs are allowed in wall assemblies that are otherwise defined as non-combustible, building and truss designers often confront the question does a joint between the wall and the roof or floor assembly mean that those elements of the building also require noncombustible material, like FRTW? To answer this, we need to study the IBC

This presentation seeks to explain how to correctly apply live loads to the bottom chord of trusses for uninhabitable attics in accordance with IRC Table R301.5 and IBC Table 1607.1 and ASCE 7-10 Table 4-1.

This presentation provides information on changes to ASCE 7-16 relating to wind loading.

This presentation provides an overview of fire-rated assemblies that include wood trusses. Topics covered include assembly testing, Harmathy’s rules, and an examination of fire performance in the field. 

I am looking for a 1-hour roof/ceiling assembly for wood truss construction. I would like to apply the drywall directly to the bottom of the truss and also have insulation for sound control. Is this possible without using channels and what UL number would I use?

In a small scale multi-family residential project, I'd like to use a wood truss floor-ceiling assembly to achieve a one hour separation between units. I'd like to directly attach the drywall to the underside of the trusses & use the truss space for ducts & lighting (the floor above will be lightweight concrete on plywood sub-floor). UL assemblies do not seem to address the duct/light penetrations in such an assembly. Can I achieve a one-hour rating in such an assembly and how are penetrations addressed? Can the ducts in the truss space serve both units above and below?

How important is continuous lateral bracing in roof trusses? Is it detrimental to the roof integrity if it is missing?

I am currently putting together a set of truss specifications for a set of structural plans. I am interested to know of the most current publication that may specify industry standards in truss components (i.e. metal connector plates, wood quality and connection quality). Do you have any suggestions?