Non-Residential Codes (IBC)

The following is a summary of code change proposals to the 2018 International Building Code (IBC) which have been submitted by various foam plastic insulation associations, including the FSC, XPSA, PIMA, and CPI. 

Since FRTW studs are allowed in wall assemblies that are otherwise defined as non-combustible, building and truss designers often confront the question does a joint between the wall and the roof or floor assembly mean that those elements of the building also require noncombustible material, like FRTW? To answer this, we need to study the IBC

This presentation seeks to explain how to correctly apply live loads to the bottom chord of trusses for uninhabitable attics in accordance with IRC Table R301.5 and IBC Table 1607.1 and ASCE 7-10 Table 4-1.

This presentation provides information on changes to ASCE 7-16 relating to wind loading.

This presentation provides an overview of fire-rated assemblies that include wood trusses. Topics covered include assembly testing, Harmathy’s rules, and an examination of fire performance in the field. 

I have recently heard of a problem with fire-retardant-treated wood (FRTW) trusses that were manufactured and installed in 1965-1980. I was searching for more information, since my job involves the protection of property in our member school districts. I had heard that the trusses make of FRTW during that time period can or will become corrosive to the hardware and the trusses will fail.

What type of construction uses a fire cut truss? Could you describe a fire cut truss?

A question has come up concerning sloped roof trusses and fire assembly ratings. Some are reluctant to rely on test results from flat (parallel chord) trusses applied to sloped roof trusses. Do you have any information regarding the suitability of the fire rated ceiling assemblies for sloped roof trusses? Does the “minimum depth” requirement of the parallel chord assembly apply to the minimum depth of a sloped roof truss (i.e., heel height?)

Are there any published studies or guidelines on the fire rating of floor trusses built with 2x3 lumber?

Is a Class A fire rating (provided by our liquid spray-on fire retardant) acceptable in certain situations?