Residential Codes (IRC)

This presentation seeks to explain how to correctly apply live loads to the bottom chord of trusses for uninhabitable attics in accordance with IRC Table R301.5 and IBC Table 1607.1 and ASCE 7-10 Table 4-1.

This Research Report will look specifically at the sill plate requirements according to the 2009, 2012, and 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) and International Building Code (IBC) and clarify if a sill plate is required in the following conditions:

  • Flat truss bottom chord bearing on ICF wall.
  • Flat truss top chord bearing on ICF wall.
  • Roof truss bearing on ICF wall.

This research report will focus on manufacturer or trade association deflection requirements for a number of floor topping/covering related products where deflection requirements may impact serviceability.

This presentation provides information on changes to ASCE 7-16 relating to wind loading.

This presentation provides an overview of fire-rated assemblies that include wood trusses. Topics covered include assembly testing, Harmathy’s rules, and an examination of fire performance in the field. 

I am looking for a 1-hour roof/ceiling assembly for wood truss construction. I would like to apply the drywall directly to the bottom of the truss and also have insulation for sound control. Is this possible without using channels and what UL number would I use?

Would you please inform me of the specified requirements of the size and the amount of nail attachments from the truss to the top plate?

We have a local builder wishing to use floor trusses with a 2-hour assembly. I have shown him the 2-hour design on pages 17-27 of the second edition of SBCA’s Metal Plate Connected Wood Truss Handbook. Is this assembly UL approved? If so, what is the design number?

How do you evaluate whether a metal plate connected truss is still usable after exposure to fire? Are there any recommended tests?

Is a Class A fire rating (provided by our liquid spray-on fire retardant) acceptable in certain situations?