Scope of Work

A best practice for building designers: find a friend to check your load paths.

This presentation provides information on changes to ASCE 7-16 relating to wind loading.

We are concerned with SBCA’s BCSI-B1 Summary Sheet which under “Notes” makes a disclaimer. Our concern is if there would be an accident with our trusses and we point out that the bracing was not placed correctly according to SBCA documentation, which is sent with every job. If the accident goes to court, how will our attorney respond when the opposing attorney points out the disclaimer, which infers that the bracing we recommend must be flawed, otherwise it would not be disclaimed?

Is a Class A fire rating (provided by our liquid spray-on fire retardant) acceptable in certain situations?

I have mono trusses on either side of a firewall. I have the fire rating/wall material between them. Can I place a ridge vent above these two? Or should I use vents? How do I calculate the appropriate vent sizes and styles?

How do I, as a truss manufacturer, adequately advise my customer against the dangers of 60 ft. and over truss span installations?

What is the correct method of attaching scissors trusses to the top plate? I read recently in a trade magazine that this type of truss should be toe-nailed on one end and attached with slotted clips on the other end. According to the article, this is to allow for movement of the truss. We require PE stamped spec sheets from the truss manufacturer to verify trusses meet wind and snow loads. These sheets give bracing requirements but never give recommended attachment requirements.

The truss industry maintains that the design of truss roof and floor system permanent bracing is the responsibility of the building designer. System permanent bracing covers the entire structure and all bracing element interactions.

My company supplied roof trusses for a hotel project. The building inspector shut the project down because the trusses were not designed to account for additional snowdrift loading. The construction plans did not contain any snowdrift loading information. The architect is claiming it is our responsibility to determine drift loading, therefore we must fix the problem. Do you have any documentation to help us dispute the architect’s claim?

We have a customer that bought trusses in June. The trusses were shipped [ and one month later are] being set. The chords have weathered and bowed. What is the industry standard for dealing with this problem? What is our liability in this situation? We were not aware of any delays on the customer’s part and shipped as requested. Note: These trusses are 62 ft. scissor trusses.