Sheathing

Question: 

In a small scale multi-family residential project, I'd like to use a wood truss floor-ceiling assembly to achieve a one hour separation between units. I'd like to directly attach the drywall to the underside of the trusses & use the truss space for ducts & lighting (the floor above will be lightweight concrete on plywood sub-floor). UL assemblies do not seem to address the duct/light penetrations in such an assembly. Can I achieve a one-hour rating in such an assembly and how are penetrations addressed? Can the ducts in the truss space serve both units above and below?

Question: 

Are there any published studies or guidelines on the fire rating of floor trusses built with 2x3 lumber?

Question: 

I have recently heard of a problem with fire-retardant-treated wood (FRTW) trusses that were manufactured and installed in 1965-1980. I was searching for more information, since my job involves the protection of property in our member school districts. I had heard that the trusses make of FRTW during that time period can or will become corrosive to the hardware and the trusses will fail.

Question: 

I need to obtain some information on fire-retardant-treated roof trusses.

This presentation provides information on overdriven nails in structural sheathing.

All building codes provide provisions for the attachment of structural sheathing to wall and roof framing members. In almost every case, the published capacity of the sheathing and fasteners assume the head of the fastener is flush with the surface of the sheathing. This Research Report discusses guidance when fasteners are overdriven.

This presentation provides information on and requirements for truss repairs.

Gypsum wallboard provides an excellent example as to
why accurate design values are so vital to structural design.

Introduction: Why the Interior Finish Installation Is Important

  • Plywood and OSB design values are given; those that are doing repairs in your office should have a good feel for the similarities and differences.
  • Plywood and OSB generally have similar design properties with a key exception of fastener strength where plywood will require more fasteners to be used.
  • If a truss repair specifies only OSB, plywood should not be substituted without written permission from the registered design professional who prepared the truss repair design drawing.
  • The strength axis of a structural panel is the direction parallel to the grain of the wood fiber in the face and back surfaces of the panel.
  • The strength axis is usually the long dimension of the panel.
  • The IBC provides two tables with the allowable spans and loads (psf) for wood structural panel sheathing installed continuous over two or more spans with their strength axis perpendicular and parallel to the supports.