Truss Plates

I market 2x4 and 2x6 structural finger-jointed lumber. As of now, we have strictly sold it as a #2 product. However, we ran some through a bender at a sawmill to test the modulus of elasticity and it looks promising. The equipment showed no recognition of the joint; it acted like regular lumber. We would like to go forward with this venture in the hopes of offering an alternative MSR to solid lumber that may also be more cost effective. What do you need to have from us to get your approval?

As a home inspector, I have recently inspected an existing home with an attic truss system installed. Several of the truss web members have been cut away to allow access to an attic-mounted heating system. Can you recommend repairs to a truss with cut web members?

I am looking for a 1-hour roof/ceiling assembly for wood truss construction. I would like to apply the drywall directly to the bottom of the truss and also have insulation for sound control. Is this possible without using channels and what UL number would I use?

What tolerances are allowed for metal plate connectors in wood trusses? How do you take into account the possible presence of splits, waves and knots?

Occasionally we deal with truss failures due to impact and or crushing forces such as trees falling onto roof structures. At what point can the truss no longer be repaired? Also, what should an adjuster look for when determining repair-ability? Or should a storm adjuster basically punt and call a consultant for every truss failure?

A question has come up concerning sloped roof trusses and fire assembly ratings. Some are reluctant to rely on test results from flat (parallel chord) trusses applied to sloped roof trusses. Do you have any information regarding the suitability of the fire rated ceiling assemblies for sloped roof trusses? Does the “minimum depth” requirement of the parallel chord assembly apply to the minimum depth of a sloped roof truss (i.e., heel height?)

I am looking to purchase a new home and have one concern about truss construction. The prongs that come off the plates and penetrate the wood seem to only penetrate about 3/8 to 1/2 in. My question is: what keeps these plates from loosening over time and the truss from possibly falling apart from the load? Can the shaking from an earthquake cause the trusses to come apart?

I am currently working on a project where a wood truss system was loaded with a heavy spring snow. I do not believe the load was beyond the truss's design capacity, but how do you know? Is there safety built into wood trusses? If the trusses were loaded beyond their design capacity, it would not have been for a long duration.

Can one use pressure-treated lumber in metal plate connected truss construction? If so, are special plates or coatings required?

How do you evaluate whether a metal plate connected truss is still usable after exposure to fire? Are there any recommended tests?