Truss Plates

Is a Class A fire rating (provided by our liquid spray-on fire retardant) acceptable in certain situations?

I have a 29 x 72 mobile office with a 2-foot deep wooden truss above the ceiling that a client is required to sprinkler. Is there any way to avoid sprinklering above the gypboard ceiling?

I am a building designer on a salt storage building project. I would like to use metal plate connected wood trusses in the design. What should I specify for the metal connector plates?

I need to obtain some information on fire-retardant-treated roof trusses.

Are there any published studies or guidelines on the fire rating of floor trusses built with 2x3 lumber?

I am developing a sustainable community in southeast Iowa. We have an abundance of cottonwoods nearby. I plan to have them sawn into dimensional lumber on the site and dry it there as well. I would like to use this material for trusses. A truss plate manufacturer informed me that because he had no data for cottonwood, he was unable to design trusses using it. Can you offer any advice?

If the truss design drawing specifies using 2x4 1650F SPF, can 2x4 No. 2 southern pine be used instead? What are some things that need to be checked?

Is it possible to construct an assembly for ceiling between first and second floors using 2x with few layers of gypsum to obtain a 3-hour fire rating?

In truss manufacturing, can hemlock, fir and spruce be used instead of Douglas Fir/Larch? What grades can be used: Structural Light Framing (Select Structural through #3) only, or Light Framing (Construction through Utility) as well?

We are having a house built and on a recent visit we brought along a friend who builds houses for a living. He noticed that the trusses were wet and a bit moldy. The wood seemed warped, brown, and had white splotches on it. We are worried that it would later make the roof uneven. How could we tell how long the trusses have been exposed to the elements? What options do we have from here? Do we request new trusses, or can these be repaired?