Floor Trusses

Question: 

What is the recommended standard spacing for open-web wood joists? I have seen them placed 24 in. O.C. Is this acceptable for a customer who will have an exercise room with 500 pounds of free weights? I understand there are problems with bouncy floors with 24 in. spacing. Is this true?

Question: 

We are concerned with SBCA’s BCSI-B1 Summary Sheet which under “Notes” makes a disclaimer. Our concern is if there would be an accident with our trusses and we point out that the bracing was not placed correctly according to SBCA documentation, which is sent with every job. If the accident goes to court, how will our attorney respond when the opposing attorney points out the disclaimer, which infers that the bracing we recommend must be flawed, otherwise it would not be disclaimed?

Question: 

I have a four-year-old house with glued open-web trusses. Both the truss manufacturer and the builder have admitted to me that the trusses were installed wrong. I have a problem with the suggested repair. I have hired a structural engineer and he suggested installing a 2x10 between each truss and removing the old truss. This would have to take place on both the first and second floors because all the trusses were installed wrong. The manufacturers want to install six strongbacks on each floor, hoping this will tighten them up.

Question: 

I have a 29 x 72 mobile office with a 2-foot deep wooden truss above the ceiling that a client is required to sprinkler. Is there any way to avoid sprinklering above the gypboard ceiling?

Question: 

We would like to know if there is a problem with using wood floor trusses with masonry bearing walls without a ledger. Our local supplier has told me that encasing the wood truss in the masonry wall could be detrimental to the truss due to moisture. What, if any, suggestions do you have for this condition? If a bottom chord bearing is used, do the trusses need fire cuts? The two-story building contains masonry bearing walls with wood trusses on the second floor and wood trusses at the roof.

Question: 

I am looking for strongback bracing requirements for a 12 in. deep residential floor system with trusses in lengths up to 19 ft. Can the strongback bracing end at a truss without tying into an end wall? For instance, can three trusses of a type be tied together by strongbacks, then the next series of different trusses be tied together without having to be tied back to the previous type of trusses?

Question: 

I am thinking of using wood trusses for the roofing/ceiling structural systems on some houses I shall build. I remember, though, an engineer/volunteer fireman commenting back in 1989 that the connector plates are prone to expand and pop off, early on in a fire, causing catastrophic structural failure. Was this the case, and if so, has this problem been corrected?

Question: 

I stamp the bottom chord of my trusses with my company name and the name of my third-party inspector. Recently, my local building inspector requested another stamp with the on-center spacing, the total design load and the load duration factor. I have never heard of this before and I was wondering if you had any further information on this requirement.

Question: 

What are the requirements on the permanent bracing of bottom chords? Can gypsum board diaphragms be used?

Question: 

IBC 2012/2015 2303.4.6 and IBC 2012/2015 2303.4.7 state: 
2303.4.6 TPI 1 specifications. In addition to Sections 2303.4.1 through 2303.4.5, the design, manufacture and quality assurance of metal-plate-connected wood trusses shall be in accordance with TPI 1. Job-site inspections shall be in compliance with Section 110.4, as applicable.