Roof Trusses

Question: 

We have a customer that bought trusses in June. The trusses were shipped [ and one month later are] being set. The chords have weathered and bowed. What is the industry standard for dealing with this problem? What is our liability in this situation? We were not aware of any delays on the customer’s part and shipped as requested. Note: These trusses are 62 ft. scissor trusses.

Question: 

If the truss design drawing specifies using 2x4 1650F SPF, can 2x4 No. 2 southern pine be used instead? What are some things that need to be checked?

Question: 

IBC 2012/2015 2303.4.6 and IBC 2012/2015 2303.4.7 state: 
2303.4.6 TPI 1 specifications. In addition to Sections 2303.4.1 through 2303.4.5, the design, manufacture and quality assurance of metal-plate-connected wood trusses shall be in accordance with TPI 1. Job-site inspections shall be in compliance with Section 110.4, as applicable.

Question: 

We are having a house built and on a recent visit we brought along a friend who builds houses for a living. He noticed that the trusses were wet and a bit moldy. The wood seemed warped, brown, and had white splotches on it. We are worried that it would later make the roof uneven. How could we tell how long the trusses have been exposed to the elements? What options do we have from here? Do we request new trusses, or can these be repaired?

Question: 

Are there any typical wood truss span tables for roofs and floors available? Standard framing details for use in preliminary design?

Question: 

The lumber used in most metal plate connected wood trusses is either visually- or mechanically-graded solid sawn dimensional lumber. However, the Truss Plate Institute's ANSI/TPI 1 allows the use of structural composite lumber (SCL) products such as laminated veneer lumber (LVL), laminated strand lumber (LSL) and parallel strand lumber (PSL). These engineered wood products can conceivably compete with sawn lumber and complement it in truss designs.

Question: 

What tolerances are allowed for metal plate connectors in wood trusses? How do you take into account the possible presence of splits, waves and knots?

Question: 

Consider this statement from a set of construction contract documents: “The Truss Manufacturer is responsible for inspecting the truss installation, bracing, anchorage and bearings and preparing a letter of verification stating that trusses are installed and braced properly.” At first glance, it may seem that the truss manufacturer is the most logical party to perform such an inspection. They are the truss experts, are they not?

Question: 

Would you please inform me of the specified requirements of the size and the amount of nail attachments from the truss to the top plate?

Question: 

I am a professional engineer looking for information concerning the failure of metal plate connected wood trusses and methods of repair. I am looking for this information with regard to developing recommendations for the repair of truss systems in the floor structures of two-story multi-family dwellings. I see frequent failure of truss systems of this type in both in bending and due to catastrophic failure at the gussets.