Roof Trusses

Our home caught fire last month and burned partly through a tongue and groove ceiling to the trusses. Some are charred. Our contractor did a moisture meter test. An engineer for the insurance company said the trusses were only smoke damaged & the moisture meter test is invalid (it can be set to read anything). I found one article on charred trusses, but it’s pretty vague. We do not feel safe with the insurance engineer’s assessment because some of the trusses are obviously charred. We hired an engineer who agreed with us.

While building a new 2-story home, I found the need to use floor trusses between the 1st and 2nd floors. Is it true that I must also use roof trusses?

Is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to provide a sealed layout drawing for roof trusses?

We have been using Turb-O-Webs for about four months. We are very happy with their performance, although there have been a few ripples along the way. The main thing that concerns me at present is the need for performance documentation and testing data. Do you have anything that will help, or know of people or organizations that could offer assistance?

I stamp the bottom chord of my trusses with my company name and the name of my third-party inspector. Recently, my local building inspector requested another stamp with the on-center spacing, the total design load and the load duration factor. I have never heard of this before and I was wondering if you had any further information on this requirement.

What is the industry standard for ordering residential roof truss systems: Should the general contractor/builder field measure before ordering trusses or should he rely on the blueprint? Who is responsible for their accuracy – the plan service, the truss manufacturer, the builder/general contractor or the framing contractor?

How long does it take the moisture content to stabilize in a wood truss? I live in southern California. Also, how much deflection should be expected in a scissors truss over a partition wall?

I am trying to develop a guideline for my firefighters regarding initial fire attack in buildings with light-weight trusses. My concern is truss failure, especially when exposed to fire. Is there any information on failure time related to flame impingement? Any information about truss failure – especially in a fire condition would be helpful.

We are building churches in Europe. These are modified pole barns and we are trying to use local materials and local volunteer labor. Since the truss is the heart of the building, I am looking for a method to test some completed trusses before the building is started to make sure they are strong enough.

I have been told that the high temperatures and low humidity present in attics can cause deterioration of wood, leading to truss failure. Is this true? If so, what length of time are we looking at and can we see the deterioration in the wood by visual inspection?