Products

Can you explain drag loads and how to calculate a drag load pertaining to roof trusses?

I am trying to determine the manufacturer of some wood trusses installed in the early 1980s in New Jersey. The stamp mark on the connector plates reads, to the best of my ability, TPL-153A (it could be PPL or TPI, but I am unsure). I need to get in contact with this truss manufacturer in order to determine design loads for the truss, as I am remodeling the store under the roof.

Our home has 2x4 roof trusses spanning 25 ft. spaced 16 in. O.C. Currently, there is limited attic storage on a plywood subfloor on the bottom chords, accessed via a small hatch in a closet. We would like to install a fold-down attic stair with a rough opening size of 25.5 in. x 54 in., with the long dimension perpendicular to the trusses. This would mean cutting the bottom chords of three trusses to frame the opening. Is this possible?

Manufactured gable ends are actually frames even though they are often referred to as trusses. The webs are “studs” oriented vertically and usually spaced at 12, 16 or 24 in. O.C. The gable end frame is designed to transfer vertical loads from the roof to the continuous bearing wall below. Another way gable end frames are different from trusses placed in the interior of the structure is that frames experience perpendicular wind loads. The sheathed frame transfers the wind loads to the roof and ceiling diaphragms and vice versa.

I installed roof trusses in my house and dry walled the ceiling to the bottom of the trusses. Now I seem to have a problem with the change of the seasons. Where the ceiling meets the interior wall, a gap opens and closes – in winter it opens, in summer it closes. What did I do wrong, how can I correct it and how should the drywall be installed in the first place?

Does SBCA have any guidelines regarding the size of a room in an attic truss? I have used a formula, length of room in inches divided by the depth of the bottom chord equaling less than 22. I was curious if any extensive studies or published articles giving more exact guidelines are available.

I almost always see wood trusses erected with no stability bracing at points of support. It seems to me that common sense and section 3.3.3.4 of The American Wood Council’s National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) require that lateral support be provided at points of bearing. Plywood decking doesn't provide any more restraint for a wood truss than it does for a roof joist. I doubt if it was a concern with short span trusses having 4 in.

Some truss lumber repair nailing patterns call for 16d common nails. Most nail guns do not support 16d nails, but have an equivalent to a 12/10d nail. Is there a substitution guide or ESR report that could help us?

A condominium project I am involved with is experiencing a sound transfer problem through the floor/ceiling assembly between the first and second floor. You can hear every footstep, from an adult to a child. The floor assembly consists of a carpet and pad, 3/4 in. OSB sub-flooring, 15 in. deep wood trusses at 16 in. on center, 9 in. fiberglass batt insulation and a 5/8 in. gypsum board ceiling. The trusses span 20 ft. with air/heat ducts between the trusses. Will an additional layer of 5/8 in. gypsum board attached to 7/8 in.

We have a local builder wishing to use floor trusses with a 2-hour assembly. I have shown him the 2-hour design on pages 17-27 of the second edition of SBCA’s Metal Plate Connected Wood Truss Handbook. Is this assembly UL approved? If so, what is the design number?