Installation

NFC Executive Director Chris Tatge and SBCA staff member Jim Vogt demonstrated on the BCMC show floor just how quickly a structure comes together with wall panels.

When Jim’s Apple Barn, the largest candy store in Minnesota, wanted to expand by way of adding a confection-filled planetarium to the end of a blazing yellow barn already bursting with sweets, it had a difficult time finding a truss company willing to take on the project. “We were the only ones that said yes,” recalled Trevor Ebinger, a member of the Manion Lumber & Truss sales staff. “It was quite an undertaking.”

When Mandere Construction couldn’t get the trusses it needed to frame its projects, owner John Mandere went looking for the best truss folks he could find—and hired them

Long span trusses can pose significant risk to installers. The dimensions and weight of a long span truss can create instability, buckling and collapse of one or many trusses, if not handled, installed, restrained and braced properly. As such, they require more detailed safety and handling measures than shorter span trusses. This research report provides guidelines for proper handling and installation of long span trusses for both wood and cold-formed steel.

Drywall cracking and ridging are typical problems seen in ceilings and walls of homes. Sometimes, both of these issues appear at the same location, with cracking appearing in wetter months and ridging in drier months. This problem has become more widespread as homeowners insist on larger rooms and open floor plans that have large clear span areas. This Research Report evaluates local environment changes that play a significant role in every gypsum ridging and cracking case.

Over the course of the last 18 months, FastenMaster worked with NFC member Scott Stevens and his staff at ModuTech to field test and provide feedback on FrameFAST, a product designed facilitate the connection of top plates to roof trusses from the ground. 

Whether increasing fines can force a change in industry safety practices remains to be seen, but one thing is for sure—the cost of failing to comply with OSHA standards is about to rise.  

This presentation provides information on overdriven nails in structural sheathing.

This presentation provides information on heel blocking requirements and related analysis.

All building codes provide provisions for the attachment of structural sheathing to wall and roof framing members. In almost every case, the published capacity of the sheathing and fasteners assume the head of the fastener is flush with the surface of the sheathing. This Research Report discusses guidance when fasteners are overdriven.