Construction

I am a building inspector and have some questions regarding how to apply IBC 2012 2308.8.5 (IRC 2012 R802.8) (similar IBC 2015 2308.4.6 & IRC 2015 R802.8) to trusses, especially those with high heels:

Are trusses required to have tags on all bearings that are not at the heel location? What about tags on webs requiring lateral reinforcement?

I am a truss manufacturer in an area of the country that often has some pretty severe winters. It concerns me how little some of the local builders seem to know about snow load design. What are some of the things that need to be considered?

I am a structural engineer designing pool cage structures that are typically attached to the house at the fascia board. Sometimes, the structure is attached where trusses are behind the fascia board and other times there is a framed gable end overhang. Do you know of any information concerning this additional load on the trusses or overhang under design wind loads? Is there a limiting distance on the amount of overhang? I know trusses are designed for certain uplift and the pool cage will add to this uplift at design load, but what about the gable end overhangs?

How do trussed roofs perform in long-term service? Are there any reports of rusting in the nail plates, rot/insect attack, do-it-yourself modifications, or condensation and ventilation problems in the attic?

How do you evaluate whether a metal plate connected truss is still usable after exposure to fire? Are there any recommended tests?

Consider this statement from a set of construction contract documents: “The Truss Manufacturer is responsible for inspecting the truss installation, bracing, anchorage and bearings and preparing a letter of verification stating that trusses are installed and braced properly.” At first glance, it may seem that the truss manufacturer is the most logical party to perform such an inspection. They are the truss experts, are they not?

What are the requirements on the permanent bracing of bottom chords? Can gypsum board diaphragms be used?

In a small scale multi-family residential project, I'd like to use a wood truss floor-ceiling assembly to achieve a one hour separation between units. I'd like to directly attach the drywall to the underside of the trusses & use the truss space for ducts & lighting (the floor above will be lightweight concrete on plywood sub-floor). UL assemblies do not seem to address the duct/light penetrations in such an assembly. Can I achieve a one-hour rating in such an assembly and how are penetrations addressed? Can the ducts in the truss space serve both units above and below?

We are finding it difficult to design permanent diagonal bracing for scissors trusses. The truss is often only a few feet in depth, which does not provide adequate room for diagonal bracing. Has SBCA come up with recommendations for permanent bracing of scissors trusses?