Loads

The Corps' guide spec for wood construction requires the drawings to indicate the design forces on each truss member for the worst loading condition. Loading conditions, of course, can include wind, snow build up, and unbalanced loading, to name a few. Many A/E firms submit drawings lacking these member forces, but instead show typical loading conditions. What does the wood truss fabricator want to see – truss diagrams with maximum loads on each member? Or would he prefer to design the truss from many required loading diagrams?

I am a structural engineer designing pool cage structures that are typically attached to the house at the fascia board. Sometimes, the structure is attached where trusses are behind the fascia board and other times there is a framed gable end overhang. Do you know of any information concerning this additional load on the trusses or overhang under design wind loads? Is there a limiting distance on the amount of overhang? I know trusses are designed for certain uplift and the pool cage will add to this uplift at design load, but what about the gable end overhangs?

Does SBCA have a state by state map for ground snow loads per the building code?

What are the requirements for installing “valley set” overlay roof trusses? I am interested in nailing and support conditions. Some engineers ask for the bottom chord of the valley truss to be ripped to match the roof pitch of the underlying trusses. Is this necessary?

What is the recommended standard spacing for open-web wood joists? I have seen them placed 24 in. O.C. Is this acceptable for a customer who will have an exercise room with 500 pounds of free weights? I understand there are problems with bouncy floors with 24 in. spacing. Is this true?

In a small scale multi-family residential project, I'd like to use a wood truss floor-ceiling assembly to achieve a one hour separation between units. I'd like to directly attach the drywall to the underside of the trusses & use the truss space for ducts & lighting (the floor above will be lightweight concrete on plywood sub-floor). UL assemblies do not seem to address the duct/light penetrations in such an assembly. Can I achieve a one-hour rating in such an assembly and how are penetrations addressed? Can the ducts in the truss space serve both units above and below?

ASCE/SEI 7-16 Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures has revised Chapter 30 regarding Components & Cladding (C&C) wind loads on roofs. This report clarifies the type and scope of changes being made that will also change in the 2018 edition of the model building codes. 

The truss industry is currently employing ASCE as its source for the loading of live loads to the bottom chord of trusses for uninhabitable attics, in accordance with the International Residential Code and the International Building Code. However, there currently is a discrepancy between ASCE 7, the IBC and the IRC. This report examines the discrepancy and the correct loading for proper truss design.

The capacity of a ribbon board and its system through the composite of the ribbon board, floor sheathing and bottom plate of the wall has not been ascertained. In order to provide better guidance, a series of tests were conducted in order to determine the capacity of the ribbon board system.

“More often than  not, if it’s a flat roof, it has a green roof on it.”