Product Performance

One analytical tool that can help you consistently determine code compliance and reliable performance is the freely available wall calculator developed by the Applied Building Technology Group (ABTG). 

Innovative thinking and careful construction allowed Truss Craft to give a condemned structure new life.

A question has come up concerning sloped roof trusses and fire assembly ratings. Some are reluctant to rely on test results from flat (parallel chord) trusses applied to sloped roof trusses. Do you have any information regarding the suitability of the fire rated ceiling assemblies for sloped roof trusses? Does the “minimum depth” requirement of the parallel chord assembly apply to the minimum depth of a sloped roof truss (i.e., heel height?)

We have a customer that bought trusses in June. The trusses were shipped [ and one month later are] being set. The chords have weathered and bowed. What is the industry standard for dealing with this problem? What is our liability in this situation? We were not aware of any delays on the customer’s part and shipped as requested. Note: These trusses are 62 ft. scissor trusses.

As a home inspector, I have recently inspected an existing home with an attic truss system installed. Several of the truss web members have been cut away to allow access to an attic-mounted heating system. Can you recommend repairs to a truss with cut web members?

In a small scale multi-family residential project, I'd like to use a wood truss floor-ceiling assembly to achieve a one hour separation between units. I'd like to directly attach the drywall to the underside of the trusses & use the truss space for ducts & lighting (the floor above will be lightweight concrete on plywood sub-floor). UL assemblies do not seem to address the duct/light penetrations in such an assembly. Can I achieve a one-hour rating in such an assembly and how are penetrations addressed? Can the ducts in the truss space serve both units above and below?

I am looking for some information regarding black surface mold on lumber. Does it alter the integrity of the lumber stress values? I have a client who wants to use “all dry” lumber for his construction but I do not know if this is really necessary.

I would like to know the proper storage and shipping of wood trusses.

I recall seeing a design recommendation several years ago regarding installation of hanger nails above the neutral axis of the bottom chord of a plated girder truss. The intent was to avoid dumping large loads into the bottom chord, below the neutral axis. Can you tell me where I can find this information?

Occasionally we deal with truss failures due to impact and or crushing forces such as trees falling onto roof structures. At what point can the truss no longer be repaired? Also, what should an adjuster look for when determining repair-ability? Or should a storm adjuster basically punt and call a consultant for every truss failure?