Construction

We have a local builder wishing to use floor trusses with a 2-hour assembly. I have shown him the 2-hour design on pages 17-27 of the second edition of SBCA’s Metal Plate Connected Wood Truss Handbook. Is this assembly UL approved? If so, what is the design number?

I am a structural engineer on a project with a wood trussed roof. I have noticed some variations in the peak height in a run of identical trusses. Do you have any information on tolerances for the final dimensions of manufactured trusses?

Are wood trusses designed to be fall protection anchors that would support a worker should he fall?

A question has come up concerning sloped roof trusses and fire assembly ratings. Some are reluctant to rely on test results from flat (parallel chord) trusses applied to sloped roof trusses. Do you have any information regarding the suitability of the fire rated ceiling assemblies for sloped roof trusses? Does the “minimum depth” requirement of the parallel chord assembly apply to the minimum depth of a sloped roof truss (i.e., heel height?)

I have a 29 x 72 mobile office with a 2-foot deep wooden truss above the ceiling that a client is required to sprinkler. Is there any way to avoid sprinklering above the gypboard ceiling?

Is it common practice for the supplier/distributor of a truss to provide a publication regarding temporary bracing with the delivery of the material?

Girders are trusses specially designed to carry extra loads that are a result of the structural framing members they support. Sometimes a single ply girder truss is insufficient to carry the entire load, so the truss designer designs a multiple-ply girder. This is where identical trusses are built and fastened together to act as one unit to support the load. ANSI/TPI 1 states that girder trusses up to three plies thick can be fastened together with nails. Girders over three plies must be pre-drilled and bolted rather than nailed.

Is it possible to retrofit a standard rafter/joist style roof to a scissors truss configuration without replacing the existing construction?

It is critical that permanent top chord bracing is supplied by proper nailing of the valley truss bottom chords to the carrying truss top chords, through purlins or properly installed rated roof sheathing. If the sheathing is not carried through under the valley framing, then the permanent top chord bracing must be supplied in another manner.

How do I, as a truss manufacturer, adequately advise my customer against the dangers of 60 ft. and over truss span installations?